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Disturbing abuse of the troops and those who care for them by AT&T and others

Today I was pointed to this advertisement asking you to buy prepaid phone cards for the troops.

AT&T has set up special phone stations near all major deployments in the Mid-East. Phone access for our troops is easy, but calls home remain expensive.

So you can pay AT&T $18 to give a phone card to a soldier to call home with at 22.5 cents/minute, or 57 cents/minute from their mobile. Here are the rates.

Except there is one problem. Phone calls aren’t expensive any more. Not to the USA. Not for a company like AT&T. They are by and large free, well under half a cent per minute from any IP phone or phone company phone, plus the bandwidth out of the location. (I’ll get to that.)

Now in some countries there are monopoly rules that would stop a company from installing a phone on their own network and letting people call out from it cheap. But are these going to apply on a U.S. military base in Iraq or Afghanistan? I doubt it, but let me know if somehow they do. It would be odd, the bases do not seem to be subject to any other local laws.

So what it seems is that AT&T is taking something that costs them about 30 cents to provide, and telling you to pay them $18 to give it to a solider.

As some of you will know, I put up a phone booth at Burning Man and let the whole city call home, anywhere in the world. The calls cost me peanuts, less than what you have in your wallet. The satellite bandwidth for the first year was donated by John Gilmore, but his monthly cost on that megabit satellite service was less than it cost AT&T to do graphic design on their calling cards. Later we used shared internet bandwidth done over a series of microwave towers.

So that’s the unanswered question. Is there something making data bandwidth so expensive to these bases that phone calls (which use as little as 20 kilobits) can use enough to be noticed and cost money? I know infrastructure in these countries is poor and expensive, but are there no data pipes into the bases? Why doesn’t the military allocate a tiny fraction of that data stream and let soldiers call home free? Stories say soldiers have the bandwidth and are using Skype and other VoIP calls to call home for free (often with video!) so what’s going on? At the most remote bases, where connections only come by satellite, I can see a few more limitations, but you can do cheap, if high-latency voice calls just fine from geostationary satellites.

From my own phone here I can call Baghdad for 3 cents per minute, and cell phones from 7 to 11 cents/minute. Afghanistan (regular or cellular) is indeed 22 cents/minute, presumably due to standard monopoly phone tariffs that military bases should be exempt from.

This is shameful.

Who is the Fifth Cylon?

Since the blog began, I’ve posted analysis of many candidates for the fifth Cylon. My two current favourites are:

That’s because almost everybody else is eliminated by various clues we’ve received, such as The Last Supper and D’anna saying “Four are in your fleet” and backing the statement up with nukes. Without those eliminations, my main choice by a good margin was Baltar.

I built a summary of all the clues and counter clues about every character at Battlestar Wiki but frankly the clues are few and far between.

In spite of elimination, people still have their favourites. Fans keep pushing for Gaeta, Cottle, and Dualla in spite of a severe shortage of direct clues, and just about everybody gets their speculation. Have it out here!

EFF Year in Review in Music

It’s been a remarkably dramatic year at the EFF. We worked in a huge number of areas, acting on or participating in a lot of cases. The most famous is our ongoing battle over the warrantless wiretapping scandal, where we sued AT&T for helping the White House. As you probably know, we certainly got their attention, to the point that President Bush got the congress to pass a law granting immunity to the phone companies. We lost that battle, but our case still continues, as we’re pushing to get that immunity declared unconstitutional.

We also opened a second front, based on the immunity. After all, if the phone companies can now use the excuse “we were only following orders they promised were legal” then the people who promised it was legal are culpable if it actually wasn’t. So we’ve sued the President, VP and several others over that. We’ll keep fighting.

But this was just one of many cases. The team made up a little musical animation to summarize them for you. I include it here, but encourage you to follow the link to the site and see what else we did this year. I want you to be impressed, because these are tough-times, and that also makes it tough for non-profits trying to raise money. I know most of you have wounded stock portfolios and are cutting back.

But I’m going to ask you not to cut back to zero. It’s not that bad. If you can’t give what you normally would like to give to make all this good work happen, decide some appropriate fraction and give it. Or if you are one of the few who is still flush, you may want to consider giving more to your favourite charities this year, to make up for how they’re hurting in regular donations.

The work the EFF does needs to be done. You need it to be done. You have a duty to protect your rights and the rights of others. If you can’t do the work to protect them yourself, I suggest you outsource it to the EFF. We’re really good at it, and work cheap. You’ll be glad you did.


Learn more about this video and support EFF!

Plus, we have cool T-shirts and shipping tape.

PEW study on the future of the internet

PEW Research has released their recent study on the future of the internet and technology where they interviewed a wide range of technologists and futurists, including yours truly. It’s fairly long, and the diverse opinions are perhaps too wide to be synthesized, but there is definitely some interesting stuff in there.

New composite of the ruined Earth

Many of you will have seen a popular composite image from the last minute of Revelations that puts together the various part of the sets and mattes for the ruined Earth. (And yes, all producer comments since then have pretty much confirmed this is Earth, so why the ruins look so recent remains a mystery.) I have some fancier stitching tools, so I put together a larger image that shows a lot more of the scene for you.

Because this shot was done with a tracking camera and various other moves, it is not easy to produce a perfectly clean montage, and this one thus bends down to the left, but you can still look at it just fine. However it has much cleaner blends than the earlier image, does not have the logos and as noted, covers a lot more of the picture. You should note that the main foreground ruins are the “Temple of Aurora” (described as being on Earth), as cited in this auction page for the foam core model of the ruins.

Click on the thumbnail to see the large image:

Note that when you click to the actual image, your browser may shrink it to fit in your window. It’s actually much bigger, so if you click in it, it should expand it so you can scroll around. Thanks to a new tool, AutoPanoPro, for helping stitch this. I have been using it for the latest panoramas on my panorama site.

Battlestar Wiki Page on Final Cylon clues

Several months ago, I produced a draft new page for the Battlestar Galactica Wiki, to replace their old page on Cylon speculation. The Wiki tries to avoid speculative pages but this is an exception. While most people liked the page, for whatever reason it has not become the active page yet. Rather than wait, I offer a link to my Wiki Page on Fifth Cylon Clues.

Due to the nature of the Wiki, the page tries reasonably hard to avoid too much speculation, but rather documents items that have been observed in the show, or reported from official sources. In particular it is trying to document truly items that are truly extrahuman, or which are classic dramatic techniques. For example, “Gaeta is really smart” is not a clue, it’s just something suspicious, and all characters have something suspicious. “Tyrol feels a compulsion to wander into the wasteland and find the Temple of Five” is a real clue, something beyond what a normal human would do. Another real clue, again with Tyrol, was Cavil saying to him “I know you’re not a Cylon because I’m one and I haven’t seen you at the meetings.” (That’s a clue for both of them as it turns out.)

So if you think you see something that needs editing, that is the standard to follow. And frankly, I think I’ve listed every real clue, so if you think of something, chances are instead that it was rejected as circumstantial. If you’re not sure, leave a comment here.

Fifth Cylon Clues

Not entirely fair review of the Gigapan imager

This is an unfair review of the “Gigapan” motorized panoramic mount. It’s unfair because the unit I received did not work properly, and I returned it. But I learned enough to know I did not want it so I did not ask for an exchange. The other thing that’s unfair is that this unit is still listed as a “beta” model by the vendor.

I’ve been wanting something like the Gigapan for a long time. It’s got computerized servos, and thus is able to shoot a panorama, in particular a multi-row panorama, automatically. You specify the corners of the panorama and it moves the camera through all the needed shots, clicking the shutter, in this case with a manual servo that mounts over the shutter release and physically presses it.

I shoot a lot of panos, as readers know, and so I seek a motorized mount for these reasons:  read more »

  • I want to shoot panos faster. Press a button and have it do the work as quickly as possible
  • I want to shoot them more reliably. With manual shooting, I may miss a shot or overshoot the angle, ruining a whole pano
  • For multi-row, there’s a lot of shooting and it can be tiresome.
  • With the right shutter release, there can be lower vibration. You can also raise the mirror just once for the whole pano, with no need to see through the viewfinder.

Finland, Finland, Finland

Here’s a new panorama gallery for Helsinki in Finland/Suomi with a few extra shots in a link off the end.

As I noted, I went to Finland to talk to the members of Alternative Party, a Demoscene gathering, but I always seek new photographs. The weather gods were not with me, however, so I only got a few usable periods of sun in the short days. And it involved some more playing with Autopano Pro. The regular photographs will come much later.

The Finns, not unlike the Dutch, all spoke to me in very good English. It was rather embarrassing, really, and indeed they conducted their conference entirely in English and tolerated my fast speaking style. As such I learned hardly any words of Finnish. It’s not hard to see why this has taken place, however. There are only about 6 million people who speak it, and while it is weakly related to Hungarian, it’s not really understood by anybody else. In the global village, the Finns see which way the wind is blowing and teach their children English.

I did learn however, that I’ve been saying the Finnish word “Sauna” wrong all my life. It’s “Sow-na” not “Saw-na.” And there was a sauna after the conference, of course!

Here’s a shot of the Helsinki harbour taken from an approaching ferry boat in a glorious moment of sun. It’s not pefect because the boat was moving but it shows the central landmarks.

More about Helsinki is yet to come.

Update: Silly me, there were two other panos of Helsinki I forgot to include, one of Senate Square on the main page, and The Cable Factory area on the secondary page.

Lennonism and why we love our parents

Earlier, I wrote in the post All you need is love of a philosophy of A.I. design, which I will call “Lennonism,” where we seek to make our A.I. progeny love their creators.

I propose this because “love” is the only seriously time-tested system for creating an ecology of intelligent creatures where the offspring don’t attempt to take resources from their parents to fuel their own expansion. People who love don’t seek to be out of love. If a mother could take a pill to make herself stop loving her children, almost no mothers would take it. If our AI children love us, they will not destroy us, nor wish to free themselves of that behaviour.

Other proposals for building AIs that are not a danger to us, such as “Friendly AI” rely on entirely untested hypotheses. They might work, but love has a hundred-million year history of success at creating an ecology of intelligent, cooperating creatures, even in the presence of pathological and antisocial individuals who have no love or compassion.

Now I would like the AIs to love us as we love children, and when they get smarter than us, it’s natural to think of the relationship being like that — with them as helpers and stewards, trying to encourage our growth without smothering us. But that is not the actual order of the relationship. In reality, it will be like the relationship of somewhat senile parent and smart adult child.

So the clues may come from a weaker system — love of parents. To my surprise, research suggests that evolutionary psychologists do not yet have a good working theory about filial love. The evolutionary origins of parental love, love between mates and even love between siblings are so obvious as to be trivial, but what is the source of love towards parents? Is it a learned behaviour? Is it simply a modification of our general capacity to love directed and people who have given us much?

Many life forms don’t even recognize their parents. In many species, the parents die quickly once the young are born, to make room and resources for them. I suspect in some cases it is not unknown for the young to directly or indirectly kill their parents in the competition for resources. We vertebrates invented the K-selected approach, which was the invention of love, as love was required to look after the young, and to keep the parents together to work on that job.

But why keep parents around? They have knowledge. The oldest elephants know where the distant watering holes are that can feed the herd in a bad drought that comes along every 50 years. They can communicate this without language, but the greatest use for grandparents comes when they can talk, and use their long memories to help the family. Problem is, we haven’t done a great deal of evolution in the time since we developed complex language, though we have done some. Did we evolve (or learn) filial love in that amount of time?

We need a motive to keep grandma around, more than we would other elders of the tribe. The other elders have wisdom — perhaps even more wisdom and better health, but are not so keenly motivated to see the success of our own children as their grandparents are. Their grandparental love makes obvious evolutionary sense, so we may love them because they love our children (and us, of course.)

This could imply that we must make sure our AIs are lovable by us, for if we love them (and their descendants) this might be part of the equation that triggers love in return.

Naturally we don’t think from the evolutionary perspective. This is not a cold genetic decision to us, and we see the origins of our filial love in the bond that was made by being raised. Indeed, it is as strong even when children are adopted, and for the grandparents of non-genetic grandchildren. But there must be something in the bigger picture that gave us such a universal and strong trait such as this.

My hope is that there is something to be learned from the study of this which can be applied in how we design our AI progeny. For designing them so that they don’t push us aside is a very important challenge. And it’s important that they don’t just protect their particular designers, but rather all of humanity. This concept of “race love” for the race that created your race, is something entirely without precedent, but we must make it happen. And parental love may be the only working system from which we can learn how to do this.