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Panoramas of Israel

Back in March, I took my first trip to the middle east, to attend Yossi Vardi’s “Kinnernet” unconference on the shores of lake Kinneret, also known as the Sea of Galilee. This is an invite-only conference and a great time, but being only 2 days long, it’s hard to justify 2 days of flying just to go to it. So I also conducted a tour of sites in Israel and a bit of Jordan.

Israel is another one of the fascinating must-do countries for an English speaker, not simply for its immense history and impressive scenery, but because it is fascinating politically, and a large segment of the population speaks English. There are other countries which are interesting politically and culturally, but you will only get to speak to that segment of the population that has learned English.

Israel is a complex country and of course one can’t understand it on a visit, since many of the natives will admit to not understanding it. Most of the people I associated with, being high-tech internet people, seemed to be on the less aggressive side, if I can call them that; people opposed to the settlers, for example, and eager for land-for-peace or two-state solutions. During my trip Gaza was in turmoil and I did not visit it. I drove through West Bank areas a couple of times but only to get from A to B — though many Israelis expressed shock that I would be willing to do that. (On our way back from Jordan, on the outskirts of Jericho, we saw a lone Haredi, wearing black hat and black coat, hitch-hiking after dark on the side of the road. Our car was full, but our driver, who was not much afraid of the west bank, did agree that was a man of particular bravery of foolishness.)

The Israelis have come to accept, like fish in water, many things that to an outside seem shocking. Having two very different levels of rights for large sections of the population. Having your car, and then later your bag, searched as you do something as simple as visiting a shopping mall. The presence of soldiers with machine guns slung on their backs almost everywhere you look. Being on the bus that simply shuttles all day along a 400 foot trip between the Jordan and Israel border stations, and having to go through a 20 minute security inspection even though it’s been in view of the Israel station the whole time. Showing ID cards all the time.

The latter is of course not unexpected but disturbing. Israelis are taught more than anybody else in school about the dangers of a society with too much identity information on its people, and which requires them to carry and show papers. So they would have been the last to accept this, but they have. It shows how extreme their situation is more than some of the other less subtle signs. If more buildings fall in the USA, we’ll become more and more like Israel.

And yet the people, both Israelis and Arabs, are all intensely friendly and gregarious. (The same whether I would reveal my Jewish ancestry or not. I do not, however, look Jewish.) Famously brusque but still warm hearted.

The food is Israel is much better than I expected. It starts with the extremely fresh ingredients grown in the tropical climate. The falafel stands on the sides of the streets put anything elsewhere to shame, and I became addicted to the fresh squeezed juices also found everywhere.

In Jerusalem, around my hotel near King George and Jaffa, I experienced an amazing contrast. On Thursday night the streets were packed full of young people, starting their weekend. On Friday night, Shabbat was observed so strictly in that area that you could hear nothing but the chirping of birds and a few distant cars. In Tel Aviv, and among the high-tech crowd, Shabbat was hard to detect.

The old city of Jerusalem is a great trip, and the Muslim quarter, which is the most lively, is not nearly so dangerous or scary, even after hours, as Israelis described it to be. Along it is the “Stations of the Cross” route which gets Christians all excited, even though it’s clearly not the original route, which was not dotted with hundreds of Muslim-run souvenir shops. Seeing an internet cafe, I joked, “And here, at station 5.5, is where Jesus stopped to check his E-mail and twitter about how tired he was.” Jerusalem, and the rest of Israel, is packed full of Christians on “holy land” tours. A friend described it as like Houston, in that it was full of Texans.

I have a very large gallery of panoramas of Israel, along with a second page of panos and a still yet to be processed gallery of regular photos to come. Also to come is the 2-day trip into Jordan to see Petra. I’m particularly pleased with the first one that I show here, a 360 degree view of the western wall (wailing wall) male section just before Shabbat. Check out the full sized version.

The overengineering and non-deployment of SSL/TLS

I have written before about how overzealous design of cryptographic protocols often results in their non-use. Protocol engineers are trained to be thorough and complete. They rankle at leaving in vulnerabilities, even against the most extreme threats. But the perfect is often the enemy of the good. None of the various protocols to encrypt E-mail have ever reached even a modicum of success in the public space. It’s a very rare VoIP call (other than Skype) that is encrypted.

The two most successful encryption protocols in the public space are SSL/TLS (which provide the HTTPS system among other things) and Skype. At a level below that are some of the VPN applications and SSH.

TLS (the successor to SSL) is very widely deployed but still very rarely used. Only the most tiny fraction of web sessions are encrypted. Many sites don’t support it at all. Some will accept HTTPS but immediately push you back to HTTP. In most cases, sites will have you log in via HTTPS so your password is secure, and then send you back to unencrypted HTTP, where anybody on the wireless network can watch all your traffic. It’s a rare site that lets you conduct your entire series of web interactions entirely encrypted. This site fails in that regard. More common is the use of TLS for POP3 and IMAP sessions, both because it’s easy, there is only one TCP session, and the set of users who access the server is a small and controlled set. The same is true with VPNs — one session, and typically the users are all required by their employer to use the VPN, so it gets deployed. IPSec code exists in many systems, but is rarely used in stranger-to-stranger communications (or even friend-to-friend) due to the nightmares of key management.

TLS’s complexity makes sense for “sessions” but has problems when you use it for transactions, such as web hits. Transactions want to be short. They consist of a request, and a response, and perhaps an ACK. Adding extra back and forths to negotiate encryption can double or triple the network cost of the transactions.

Skype became a huge success at encrypting because it is done with ZUI — the user is not even aware of the crypto. It just happens. SSH takes an approach that is deliberately vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks on the first session in order to reduce the UI, and it has almost completely replaced unencrypted telnet among the command line crowd.

I write about this because now Google is finally doing an experiment to let people have their whole gmail session be encrypted with HTTPS. This is great news. But hidden in the great news is the fact that Google is evaluating the “cost” of doing this. There also may be some backlash if Google does this on web search, as it means that ordinary sites will stop getting to see the search query in the “Referer” field until they too switch to HTTPS and Google sends traffic to them over HTTPS. (That’s because, for security reasons, the HTTPS design says that if I made a query encrypted, I don’t want that query to be repeated in the clear when I follow a link to a non-encrypted site.) Many sites do a lot of log analysis to see what search terms are bringing in traffic, and may object when that goes away.  read more »

Secrets of the "Clear" airport security line

Yesterday it was announced that “Clear” (Verified ID Pass) the special “bypass the line at security” card company, has shut its doors and its lines. They ran out of money and could not pay their debts. No surprise there, they were paying $300K/year rent for their space at SJC and only 11,000 members used that line.

As I explained earlier, something was fishy about the program. It required a detailed background check, with fingerprint and iris scan, but all it did was jump you to the front of the line — which you get for flying in first class at many airports without any background check. Their plan, as I outline below, was to also let you use a fancy shoe and coat scanning machine from GE, so you would not have to take them off. However, the TSA was only going to allow those machines once it was verified they were just as secure as existing methods — so again no need for the background check.

To learn more about the company, I attended a briefing they held a year ago for a contest they were holding: $500,000 to anybody who could come up with a system that sped up their lines at a low enough cost. I did have a system, but also wanted to learn more about how it all worked. I feel sorry for those who worked hard on the contest who presumably will not be paid.  read more »

The background check

Features for high-end digital cameras

I’m really enjoying my Canon EOS 5D Mark II, especially its ability to shoot at 3200 ISO without much noise, allowing it to be used indoors, handheld without flash. But as fine as this (and other high end) cameras are, I still see a raft of features missing that I hope will appear in future cameras.

Help me fix my mistakes

A high end camera has full manual settings, which is good. But even the best of us make mistakes with these settings, mistakes the camera should know about and warn us about. It should not stop us from making shots, or in many circumstances try to correct the mistakes. But it should notice them, and beep when I take a picture, and show the mistake on the display with menu options to correct it, to always correct it, or not not warn me again about it for a day or forever.

I write earlier about the general principle of noticing when we’ve left the camera in an odd mode. If we put the camera into incandescent white balance in the evening and then a day later the camera notice we’re shooting in a sunny environment, it should know and alert us, or even fix it. This is true of a variety of settings that are retained through a non-shooting period, including exposure compensation, white balance, shooting modes, ISO changes and many others. The camera should learn over time what our “normal” modes are that we do like to leave the camera in, and not warn us about them, but warn us about other unusual things.

Many things will be obvious to the camera. If I shoot in manual mode and then later take another shot in manual mode that’s obviously way overexposed or underexposed, I probably just forgot, and would not mind the reminder. The reminder might also offer to delete the bad shot.

There are many things the camera can detect, including big blobs of sensor dust. Lenses left in manual focus should be noticed after a long gap of time, and especially if the lens has been removed and returned to the camera. Again, this should not impinge on the UI much — just a beep and a chance to see what the problem was on the screen.

Add bluetooth and other communications protocols to the camera

Let the camera talk to other devices. One obvious method would be bluetooth. With that, let the camera use bluetooth microphones and headsets when it records video and annotations. Let me hear the camera’s beeps and audio in a bluetooth headset so as not to disturb others. Let the camera talk to a Bluetooth GPS or GPS equipped phone to get geolocation data for photos. Let the camera be controlled via bluetooth from a laptop, and let it upload photos to a computer as it currently can do over USB. Let me use my phone or any other bluetooth remote as a remote control for the camera — indeed, on a smart phone, let me go so far as to control all aspects of the camera and see the live preview. Start making bluetooth controlled flash modules to replace the infrared protocols — it’s more reliable and won’t trigger other people’s flashes. Build simple bluetooth modules that can connect to the hotshoe or IR of existing flashes to convert them to this new system. Bluetooth would also allow keyboards (and even mice) for fancier control of the camera, and configuration of parameters that today require software on a PC. A bluetooth mouse, with its wheels (like the camera’s wheels) could make an interesting remote control.

With Bluetooth 3.0, which can go 480 megabits, this is also a suitable protocol for downloading photos or live tethering. Wireless USB (also 480 megabits at short range) is another contender.

Let it be a USB master as well as slave, so it can also be connected to USB GPSs and other peripherals dream up, including cell phones, most of which can now be a USB slave. This would also allow USB microphones, speakers and video displays.

Finally, add a protocol (USB or just plain IP) to the hot shoe to make this happen. (See below.)

Make more use of the microphone

I’ve always liked the idea of capturing a few seconds of sound around every still photo. This can be used for mood, or it can be used for notes on the photo. Particularly if we can do speech-to-text on the audio later, so that I can put captions on photos right then and there. This would work especially well if I can get a bluetooth headset with high quality microphone audio, something that is still hard to do right now.

If your camera can shoot video, it can of course be used as an audio recorder by putting on the lens cap, but why not just offer a voice recorder mode once you have gone to the trouble to support a good microphone.

Treat the camera as a software platform

Let other people write code to run on the camera. Add-on modules and new features. For low-end, deliberately crippled cameras this might not be allowed, but if I’m paying more for my camera than a computer, I should be able to program it, or download other people’s interesting programs.

Furthermore, let this code send signals to other devices, over USB, the flash shoe, and even bluetooth. Consider including a few general purpose digital read/write pins for general microcontroller function, or make a simple module to allow that.

Letting others write code for your product has a cost — you must define APIs and support them. But the benefits are vast, and would generate great loyalty to the camera to do this first. I imagine software for panorama taking, high-dynamic range photography, timelapse, automatic exposure evaluation and much more — perhaps even the mistake-detection described above.

Create a fancy new hotshoe with data flow and power flow

The hotshoe should include a generalized data bus like two-way USB or just IP over something. Make all peripherals, including flashes, speak this protocol for control. But also allow the unit on the flash hot shoe to control the camera — this will be a two way street.

In the hotshoe, include pins for power — both to access the power from the camera, and to allow hotshoe devices to assist powering the camera and to charge the battery. This would allow the creation of low-powered flashes which are small and don’t need a battery because they draw from the camera battery. Not big, but suitable for fill flash and other purposes. The 5D has no built-in flash and I miss the fill-flash of the on-camera flash of the 40D. Obviously you don’t want devices sucking all the battery, and some might have their own batteries, but I would rather carry two camera batteries than have to carry a camera battery and then another battery type and charger type for my flash!

One could make a hotshoe device that holds more camera batteries, as an alternative to the battery grip. But hotshoe devices, with their data link, could do much more than control flashes. They could include fancy audio equipment, even a controller for the servo motors of a rotating pano-head or pan and scan tripod. Hotshoe devices could include wifi or bluetooth if it’s not already in the phone. Or GPS location.

The Hotshoe would offer 5v USB style power to start, but on approval, switch the power lines to high-current direct battery access, to allow extra power devices, and even battery chargers or AC adapters.

Support incremental download

Perhaps some cameras do this but I have not seen it. Instead of deleting photos from cards, just let things cycle through, and have the downloader only fetch the new photos, and mark the ones fetched as ready for deletion when needed. It’s always good to have your photos in multiple places — why delete them from the card before you need to? Possibly make the old photos semi-invisible. And, as I have asked before, when a photo is deleted, don’t delete it, but move it to a recycle bin where I can undelete. Of course, as space is needed, purge things from that bin in order. Though still call it delete, so that when rent-a-cops try to make you delete photos, you can fake it.

Put an Arca-swiss style plate on the bottom of the camera

Serious photographers have all settled on this plate, and have one stuck to the bottom of their camera, which is annoying when the camera is on your neck. Put these dovetails right into the base of the camera, with a standard tripod hole in the center (as these plates often can’t quite do as they must put the screw in the center.) I pay $50 for every new camera to get a custom plate. Just build it in. Those with other QR systems can still connect to the 1/4-20 tripod hole.

Consider a new format between jpeg and raw

The jpeg compression is good enough that detail is not lost. What is lost is exposure range. Raw format preserves everything, but is very large and slower and harder to use when organizing photographs — its main value is in post-processing photographs. A 12 bit jpeg standard exists, but is not widely used, but if cameras started offering it, I expect we would see support for it proliferate, even faster than support for raw has done.

Show me the blurries

A feature I have been requesting for some time. After I take a photo, let one of the review modes offered provide a zoom in of something that is supposed to be in focus. That could be the best focus point, or simply the most contrasty part of the photo. If, when I see the most contrasty part of the photo, it’s still blurry, I can know I didn’t focus right or hold the camera steady enough. If using focus points, the wheel could rotate around the focus points that were supposed to be in focus, so I can see what was probably my subject and how well it was shot.

Have a good accelerometer, and use it

Most cameras have a basic accelerometer to know if the camera is in portrait mode. (Oddly, they don’t all use it to know how to display photos on the screen.) But you can do much more. For example, you should be able to tell if the camera is on a tripod or handheld, based on how steady it is. That knowledge can be used to enable or disable the image stabilizer. It can also be used to add stability, by offering to delay the shutter release until the camera is being held steady when doing longer exposures. (Nikon had a feature called BSS, where it would shoot several long exposure shots, and retain the one that was least blurry. This should be a regular feature for all cameras.) Knowing the camera is stable on a tripod should also allow automatic exposure controllers to make more use of longer exposures if they need to in low light, though of course with moving subjects you still need manual control. (The camera should also be able to tell if the subjects are moving if it knows the camera itself is stable.)

Like new phones, also have a compass, and record the direction of all photos, to add to GPS data. This would allow identification of subjects. It would also allow “panorama” modes that know when you have rotated the camera sufficiently for the next overlapping shot. Finally, the accelerometer should offer me a digital level on the screen so I can quickly level the camera.

Embrace your inner eBook

I wrote about this last month — realize we are using cameras to do more than just take pictures.

Use the battery to power AC startup surge in an RV

Many RVs come with generators, and the air conditioner is the item that demands it be a high power generator. The Generator needs to be big enough to run the AC, and in theory let you do other things like microwave when you run it. It also has to be big enough to handle the surge that the AC motor takes when the AC starts up.

This surge is huge, and will often overload a generator, particularly external generators that are commonly used on smaller RVs. To fix this problem, there’s been a bit of effort to develop “soft start” electric motor technologies that start up motors slowly, and store charge in a big capacitor in order to provide the surge.

However, the RV also has a deep cycle battery and (if a motorhome) an engine starting battery. Both these batteries can usually deliver 100 or more amps in a burst. (The engine starting battery can deliver several hundred.)

Today, high-power inverters have gotten much cheaper, even those that can deliver 500 to 1,000 watts (and peak to far more) are getting cheap. I have wondered why it has not become standard to include a high power inverter in any RV so that small 110v appliances can’t be run off the battery for short times, rather than firing up the generator. To microwave something for 30 seconds requires starting the generator which is quite wasteful, and also noisy. Of course, what runs off the battery should still run on 12 volts, and some things (like the fridge in electric mode) should not run off an inverter. Short microwave bursts, and a few hours of flatscreen TV watching can run off an inverter.

And so my proposal is that such an inverter also be available to provide surge power to the AC compressor when it starts, even if the generator or shore power is on. The extra 1000 or so watts the inverter can provide would allow the use of a smaller, cheaper generator. This requires an inverter that can sync to the phase of the incoming AC, and of course safety circuits to assure that power is not fed back into the shore power port when it is disconnected.

Today, the big trend in generators is actually to have them use such high-power inverters. The generators are thus free to generate dirty power, and to run at whatever RPM is best for them at the time. The inverter cleans up the power and puts out clean, constant voltage. There are modest losses but overall it’s a win, as you get a generator that is much more efficient and quiet, and better quality power. Many suspect that RV generators will switch to that approach. In this case, it becomes much easier to have an integrated inverter generator able to also draw from the battery for its surges. No need for grid tie logic in this case.

To wit, one could see a system where a 2kw inverter generator, able to boost to 3.5kw by adding in the battery, could be enough for a typical RV, even with a decent sized AC. You might have to have a circuit that says “If the microwave or other big load is on, don’t start the compressor” but that would only be an issue if you wanted to microwave something for a long time on high. Note in a proper AC the compressor is not running all the time, so the AC would not be off — it would just not be doing on cycles during the microwave use.

There would probably be some 110v plugs in the RV which are marked “On under shore or generator power only” vs “always on,” or possibly switches to control if they are on the inverter or not, since there are loads you would want to make sure stay off if running only on battery. A little more complexity to the internal wiring, but a big saving on generator size and a better dry camping experience. It also means a more usable RV when plugging into a 15 amp external shore power line. In many RVs, plugging into 15 amps is not enough to start the AC, and certainly not enough to run the AC and another device. The power control system would want to know if it’s plugged into 15A, 20A or the normal 30A. And it would also want to notice if something is drawing too much battery power and shut it off before the battery gets too low.

Obviously as well, the 12 volt converter and battery charger must only run off true shore power or the generator, never off the inverter!

Anti-atrocity system with airdropped video cameras

Our world has not rid itself of atrocity and genocide. What can modern high-tech do to help? In Bosnia, we used bombs. In Rwanda, we did next to nothing. In Darfur, very little. Here’s a proposal that seems expensive at first, but is in fact vastly cheaper than the military solutions people have either tried or been afraid to try. It’s the sunlight principle.

First, we would mass-produce a special video recording “phone” using the standard parts and tools of the cell phone industry. It would be small, light, and rechargeable from a car lighter plug, or possibly more slowly through a small solar cell on the back. It would cost a few hundred dollars to make, so that relief forces could airdrop tens or even hundreds of thousands of them over an area where atrocity is taking place. (If they are $400/pop, even 100,000 of them is 40 million dollars, a drop in the bucket compared to the cost of military operations.) They could also be smuggled in by relief workers on a smaller scale, or launched over borders in a pinch. Enough of them so that there are so many that anybody performing an atrocity will have to worry that there is a good chance that somebody hiding in bushes or in a house is recording it, and recording their face. This fear alone would reduce what took place.

Once the devices had recorded a video, they would need to upload it. It seems likely that in these situations the domestic cell system would not be available, or would be shut down to stop video uploads. However, that might not be true, and a version that uses existing cell systems might make sense, and be cheaper because the hardware is off the shelf. It is more likely that some other independent system would be used, based on the same technology but with slightly different protocols.

The anti-atrocity team would send aircraft over the area. These might be manned aircraft (presuming air superiority) or they might be very light, autonomous UAVs of the sort that already are getting cheap in price. These UAVs can be small, and not that high-powered, because they don’t need to do that much transmitting — just a beacon and a few commands and ACKs. The cameras on the ground will do the transmitting. In fact, the UAVs could quite possibly be balloons, again within the budget of aid organizations, not just nations.  read more »

Authenticated actions as an alternative to login

The usual approach to authentication online is the “login” approach — you enter userid and password, and for some “session” your actions are authenticated. (Sometimes special actions require re-authentication, which is something my bank does on things like cash transfers.) This is so widespread that all browsers will now remember all your passwords for you, and systems like OpenID have arise to provide “universal sign on,” though to only modest acceptance.

Another approach which security people have been trying to push for some time is authentication via digital signature and certificate. Your browser is able, at any time, to prove who you are, either for special events (including logins) or all the time. In theory these tools are present in browsers but they are barely used. Login has been popular because it always works, even if it has a lot of problems with how it’s been implemented. In addition, for privacy reasons, it is important your browser not identify you all the time by default. You must decide you want to be identified to any given web site.

I wrote earlier about the desire for more casual athentication for things like casual comments on message boards, where creating an account is a burden and even use of a universal login can be a burden.

I believe an answer to some of the problems can come from developing a system of authenticated actions rather than always authenticating sessions. Creating a session (ie. login) can be just one of a range of authenticated actions, or AuthAct.

To do this, we would adapt HTML actions (such as submit buttons on forms) so that they could say, “This action requires the following authentication.” This would tell the browser that if the user is going to click on the button, their action will be authenticated and probably provide some identity information. In turn, the button would be modified by the browser to make it clear that the action is authenticated.

An example might clarify things. Say you have a blog post like this with a comment form. Right now the button below you says “Post Comment.” On many pages, you could not post a comment without logging in first, or, as on this site, you may have to fill other fields in to post the comment.

In this system, the web form would indicate that posting a comment is something that requires some level of authentication or identity. This might be an account on the site. It might be an account in a universal account system (like a single sign-on system). It might just be a request for identity.

Your browser would understand that, and change the button to say, “Post Comment (as BradT).” The button would be specially highlighted to show the action will be authenticated. There might be a selection box in the button, so you can pick different actions, such as posting with different identities or different styles of identification. Thus it might offer choices like “as BradT” or “anonymously” or “with pseudonym XXX” where that might be a unique pseudonym for the site in question.

Now you could think of this as meaning “Login as BradT, and then post the comment” but in fact it would be all one action, one press. In this case, if BradT is an account in a universal sign-on system, the site in question may never have seen that identity before, and won’t, until you push the submit button. While the site could remember you with a cookie (unless you block that) or based on your IP for the next short while (which you can’t block) the reality is there is no need for it to do that. All your actions on the site can be statelessly authenticated, with no change in your actions, but a bit of a change in what is displayed. Your browser could enforce this, by converting all cookies to session cookies if AuthAct is in use.

Note that the first time you use this method on a site, the box would say “Choose identity” and it would be necessary for you to click and get a menu of identities, even if you only have one. This is because a there are always tools that try to fake you out and make you press buttons without you knowing it, by taking control of the mouse or covering the buttons with graphics that skip out of the way — there are many tricks. The first handover of identity requires explicit action. It is almost as big an event as creating an account, though not quite that significant.

You could also view the action as, “Use the account BradT, creating it if necessary, and under that name post the comment.” So a single posting would establish your ID and use it, as though the site doesn’t require userids at all.  read more »

ClariNet history and the 20th anniversary of the dot-com

Twenty years ago (Monday) on June 8th, 1989, I did the public launch of ClariNet.com, my electronic newspaper business, which would be delivered using USENET protocols (there was no HTTP yet) over the internet.

ClariNet was the first company created to use the internet as its platform for business, and as such this event has a claim at being the birth of the “dot-com” concept which so affected the world in the two intervening decades. There are other definitions and other contenders which I discuss in the article below.

In those days, the internet consisted of regional networks, who were mostly non-profit cooperatives, and the government funded “NSFNet” backbone which linked them up. That backbone had a no-commercial-use policy, but I found a way around it. In addition, a nascent commercial internet was arising with companies like UUNet and PSINet, and the seeds of internet-based business were growing. There was no web, of course. The internet’s community lived in e-Mail and USENET. Those, and FTP file transfer were the means of publishing. When Tim Berners-Lee would coin the term “the web” a few years later, he would call all these the web, and HTML/HTTP a new addition and glue connecting them.

I decided I should write a history of those early days, where the seeds of the company came from and what it was like before most of the world had even heard of the internet. It is a story of the origins and early perils and successes, and not so much of the boom times that came in the mid-90s. It also contains a few standalone anecdotes, such as the story of how I accidentally implemented a system so reliable, even those authorized to do so failed to shut it down (which I call “M5 reliability” after the Star Trek computer), stories of too-early eBook publishing and more.

There’s also a little bit about some of the other early internet and e-publishing businesses such as BBN, UUNet, Stargate, public access unix, Netcom, Comtex and the first Internet World trade show.

Extra, extra, read all about it: The history of ClariNet.com and the dawn of the dot-coms.

Apple blocks iPhone App because EFF blog points to my Downfall Parody

Last week, I posted a pointer to my parody of a famous clip from the movie Downfall and I hope you enjoyed it. While the EFF itself didn’t make this video, I do chair the foundation and they posted a pointer to it on the “Deep Links” blog. All well and good.

Some time earlier, an iPhone app developer put together an iPhone app which would display the EFF blog feed. This wasn’t an EFF effort, but the EFF gave them permission to put the logo in the app.

Recently, Apple’s App Store team evaluated the app. The pulled up the EFF blog feed, and played the video, presumably using the built in YouTube playing App which Apple provides for the iPhone. And in the subtitles I wrote, at one point when Hitler was particularly angry, the fake text had him say “fucking.” This is quite mild compared to most of the Downfall parodies on YouTube, and indeed many other videos on YouTube. I debated taking it out, but it’s appropriate for the character to be using strong angry language at that point in his rant. And it’s funny to see Hitler swear in English so I left it in.

The App Store team — dare I call them the Apple App Store content Nazis, or is that too meta? — declared the app unsuitable for the iPhone store. Note that the app doesn’t contain any dirty words, and the EFF blog rarely contains them, and didn’t contain them in this case, only pointing to the video. Of course, the EFF as a free speech organization is not about to declare its blog will be free of bad words in the future, though they are a fairly unlikely event.

Yet this, it seems, is what Apple is protecting its users from. Apple claims that it needs to control what Apps you can install on an iPhone. You need to “jailbreak” the iPhone to install other apps, and Apple says you don’t have the right to do that. Sometimes such walled gardens start off with what you may agree are good intentions, such as stopping malicious apps, or assuring a quality experience with a product. But always, it seems, it devolves to this.

You can also read the EFF Deep Links article on this bizarre denial. Apple seems to have become a parody of itself. How long before we see a Downfall clip where Hitler is an Apple app store evaluator, or a fake Steve Jobs? Of course, that had better not contain any upsetting words, even in links.