More on entertainment.com

In my quest over the leak/sale of the entertainment.com mailing list, I have some amusing updates.

After telling them you don't respond to a "You sold my name" complaint with a request for all of the person's personal information, I got back yet another stock message, "Here's how you can get off our mailing list." I'm getting a lot of companies who use customer service reps for E-mail who clearly never read the E-mails. Yes, I also get software that auto-responds, but amazingly we also get humans who auto-respond.

Anyway, customer service clearly not working, I found their phone number and called their legal dept. where I spoke with a Jill Silverman. She expressed concern after she got clear on what had happened, and asked me to forward her the emails I had gotten to my special address created just for them. I immediately sent them off then heard nothing.

When I inquired again, she told me she never got the E-mails. I figured out why, eventually. The E-mails, which I had put in a text file attachment, were of course spams, and triggered her company's spam filter. Of course, my mail was dropped on the floor, no diagnostic for her or me.

So I put them in a web page and sent her the URL. That should make it through!

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His name is Brad Templeton. You figure it out.
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